© 2017 by Cate Campbell.

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HOW I WORK

I work to the ethical framework of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), the College of Sexual and Relationship Therapy (COSRT), and Association of Family Therapy (AFT) and have regular Criminal Records Bureau checks.

I comply with data protection legislation and maintain the security of all client information. I would not normally share information from or about my clients except in very exceptional circumstances where there was good reason to be concerned about issues of safety, particularly if these related to a vulnerable individual.

As an ethical practitioner, I receive regular supervision in accordance with BACP and COSRT guidance, where client confidentiality is maintained.

Skills and Interventions

I am an integrative counsellor, which means I have a “toolbox” of skills and techniques from different therapeutic orientations which I can draw on depending on what is needed, combining these as necessary.

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is concerned with the here and now, looking at how thoughts, feelings and behaviour affect one another. Unhelpful thinking can lead to negative feelings and behaviour which feed the negative thinking. Interrupting this process can give back feelings of control, adequacy and self-esteem.

Systemic Counselling is also about making a difference to the way we live by looking at how individuals behave within groups or “systems”, such as families or couples. It is particularly helpful when people are troubled by cycles of arguing and feel they don’t know what to do or where to turn. Systemic counselling can help by offering different ways of looking at problems so that you develop the means to master them.

Solution-Focused Brief Therapy concentrates on identifying what people want to achieve in counselling, helping them to make lasting change by recognising and drawing on their own resources.

Psychodynamic Counselling takes into account how previous experience may have affected an individual. Some people think that “psycho”- anything means someone will be probing their mind and trying to catch them out – in fact, it often works in the opposite way, giving people an insight into why they feel the way they do and what will help with that. This is especially helpful for people who have a tendency to blame themselves or others.

Transactional Analysis is a way of looking at the dynamics of relationships and personal motivation which can then be modified to become more helpful.

Eye Movement Desensitisation & Reprocessing (EMDR) is a powerful technique which works like rapid eye movement sleep to help people process distressing memories. It is especially useful in managing the consequences of trauma, disturbing life events, phobias, depression and anxiety.

PSYCHOSEXUAL THERAPY

Sexual problems may be the first sign of a relationship difficulty, or there may be issues which have always been a concern. Sometimes events such as illness or pregnancy trigger problems. Doing something about them is daunting but they magnify in your mind the longer you leave them unresolved. An initial conversation about what may help will give you the chance to think over whether you wish to proceed. Counselling with a specifically sexual focus is available to individuals and couples over the age of 18.

Ethical Issues

I work to the ethical framework of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), the College of Sexual and Relationship Therapy (COSRT), EMDR Europe and Association of Family Therapy (AFT) and have regular Criminal Records Bureau checks.

I comply with data protection legislation and maintain the security of all client information. I would not normally share information from or about my clients except in very exceptional circumstances where there was good reason to be concerned about issues of safety, particularly if these related to a vulnerable individual.

As an ethical practitioner, I receive regular supervision in accordance with BACP and COSRT guidance, where client confidentiality is maintained.

Couples, in particular, often hang on until their relationship is at breaking point before seeking help, especially if they have not been together for long. However, if counselling crosses your mind, why wait? There are pinch points in all our lives -- sometimes even the happiest events, such as going to university, beginning a new job or starting a family can turn out to bring unforeseen stresses.  
It is tempting to try to struggle on with more obvious stressors, such as bringing up teenagers, redundancy, bereavement or poor health, but leaving things may only exacerbate the problem. Incidentally, parents often believe they are hiding difficulties from their children. In fact, they are usually well aware when their parents are distressed or aren’t getting on, and their “naughty” behaviour can often be a reaction to this.
Even if you begin attending as an individual or couple, you can bring “guests” or other family members by prior arrangement. You do not have to be married or in a relationship. All clients are welcome, regardless of background, race, gender, religion, sexuality, personal beliefs or age. However, young people under the age of 16 should obtain consent of their parent or guardian.

 Older people also sometimes feel it is too late to make a difference but this is rarely true. On the contrary, maybe the time has come to make things better. Older people are increasingly seeking counselling, including for sexual problems .

 

 

WHO BENEFITS FROM COUNSELLING?

WHAT IS COUNSELLING LIKE?

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Sometimes people come to counselling fearing they will be expected to lie on a couch and that the counsellor either won’t speak to them or that they will be bombarded with intrusive questions. I don’t work like that! I think is important to be in surroundings where you feel at ease and that you feel part of a collaborative enterprise, keeping me aware of what is helping and useful for you. It’s true that counselling can sometimes be challenging and you may feel outside your comfort zone on occasions, but you should feel this is happening in a safe environment where you are supported and have a counsellor who responds to your concerns. Similarly, you should always feel able to ask questions and feel informed about the counselling process.